Volume 7, Issue 6, November 2019, Page: 93-99
Hybridization of Terrestrial Radio and SNSs for Public Engagements is Synergy for Social Capital in Digital Age
Moses Ofome Asak, Department of Communication, Faculty of Humanities, North West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Abiodun Salawu, Department of Communication, Faculty of Humanities, North West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Received: Jul. 22, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 21, 2019;       Published: Dec. 6, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijsts.20190706.13      View  281      Downloads  108
Abstract
The use of social network sites (SNSs) by people in and outside work settings has become a global phenomenon and this activity is growing at geometric progression. Consequently, the growth of the use of SNSs as a major communication tool now has a relatively greater importance for organizations’ continual communication with the public and in building relationships. The use of SNSs today cuts across boundaries and seems to dim the attraction for the use of other forms of digital communication. This is essentially because of its stronger interactive ability to build virtual communities and followers for different organizations and individuals. In this paper, the use of social media, particularly social network sites by traditional radio broadcasting for public engagement is examined to establish its offer of social capital for radio stations, the public and advertisers. The paper draws from McLuhan’s Technological Determinism; Katz, Blumler & Gurevitch Uses and Gratification theories as theoretical foundation in tandem with qualitative analysis of documented relevant literature from which deductions were made. The discourse suggests that radio stations especially in developing countries must step up integrating the use of SNSs for associated socio-economic benefits if the stations are to remain relevant in current digital media landscape.
Keywords
Terrestrial Broadcasting, Radio, Social Network Sites, Public Engagement, Social Capital
To cite this article
Moses Ofome Asak, Abiodun Salawu, Hybridization of Terrestrial Radio and SNSs for Public Engagements is Synergy for Social Capital in Digital Age, International Journal of Science, Technology and Society. Vol. 7, No. 6, 2019, pp. 93-99. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsts.20190706.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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